Vigil

Yesterday evening, CCCq- Canterbury Christ Church University’s Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Queer and intersex staff network organised a Vigil in memory of those murdered in Orlando on 13th of June. The event was held at the University Chapel, and supported by the university chaplaincy and senior management team. We heard from staff and students and lit candles in memory of those we lost.

As the global LGBTQi community are in mourning for 49 of its family who were murdered, we extend our sympathy to their friends and their families and keep all of those who were injured and affected in our thoughts. We stand in solidarity with our global Queer family and remember that the 49 people massacred add to an ever growing number of people who are killed because of hatred and intolerance towards our community, because of homophobia, transphobia and biphobia.

In the aftermath of this attack we have seen so much erasure of the LGBTQi community. Those in the media, church and political leaders, claiming that ‘these could have been any night club goers’, blaming this attack on religion, on global terrorism and contributing to the erasure of the victim’s queer identities. This was a hate crime. These people were murdered because of their sexual and gender identity. Because the society they, and we live in, is one of homophobia, transphobia and biphobia. Those who discriminate against us, who bully the children of our community in schools, who do not protect us when we are vulnerable, who laugh at us, who deny us rights, they are all complicit with these murders.

We did not offer a book of condolences because where would we send it? These things usually are sent to some dignitary, head of state, mayor, governor. In Florida, where this awful attack happened, LGBTQi people can still be fired for their sexual or gender identity without any protection. Those who deny us protection are complicit with these murders.

Before people left, they were asked to take a minute to post on our graffiti wall, which we will share online. over the coming days We will tell the world that Canterbury Christ Church University and the wider community present today stand together, in solidarity ad defiance. Along with our many allies, who with us advocate and fight for liberation, we Stand in Power.

To our family lost in Orlando. To all lost to homophobia, transphobia and biphobia: Rest in Power.

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CCCq to hold vigil in response to Orlando terror attack – Wednesday 15 June, 5.30pm

On Sunday morning at 02:00 a gunman entered Pulse, an LGBTQ night club in Orlando, Florida, and killed at least 50 people, injuring numerous others.

A short vigil will take place outside of the University’s chapel on Wednesday 15 June at 5.30pm. All staff, students and community members are welcome to attend.

We are also flying the Pride flag at half-mast outside Augustine House, in solidarity and sympathy with the victims of this atrocity.

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CCCq Marching @ London Pride 2016 (25 Jun 2016)

We are delighted to be marching at the London Pride 2016 on Saturday 25th of June. Everyne wishing to support LGBTIQ staff and students at CCCU is welcome to join us, so if you work or study at CCCU please come along. Partners, family, friends and allies are also all very welcome.

Please see our Eventbrite page here for details of time and place and to register your attendance so that we have an idea of numbers.

See you there!

Re-Radicalising Queers

LGBT History Month 2016 Re-radicalising queersRe-Radicalising Queers – a public discussion on the LGBT movement took place on the 15th of February at Canterbury Christ Church University. The event was organised by CCCq, the university’s Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Queer and intersex staff network and hosted a range of speakers including international Human Rights activist Peter Tatchell, Prof. Bee Scherer, CCCU; Sue Sanders, School͛s OUT; Paul Twocock, Stonewall and Rt Reverend Dr Alan Wilson, Bishop of Buckingham.

The event was opened by Elzy Clements-Johnson, President of the student LGBT+ society who commented on how the LGBT community has developed and progressed to give those who don’t fit into the traditional categories a space and a voice. Vice-Chancellor Professor Rama Thirunamachandran gave the welcoming address and noted the various political, legal and social achievements of the LGBT movement in the past five decades and thanked the organisers of Re-Radicalising Queers for creating the space to discuss how to move forward, given the various challenges and inequalities that are prevalent for the LGBT community.

PT by PatrickKeynote speaker Peter Tatchell took the audience on a chronological trip, focussing on some of the major achievements to date and remembering the queer activists who have gone before. ‘We walk in their shadows,’ Tatchell remarked. Within his address Peter questioned the continuing focus on equality, suggesting that the liberation movement of the 70s and 80s was far more ambitious, striving to change society for the better rather than become equal citizens in a flawed system.

Following this, the panel members each gave a short input on their own perspectives on the LGBT movement. Professor Scherer remarked on the need to disrupt and destruct hetero-patriarchy within society, suggesting that many movements disguised as liberal and progressive prop up this system. They described Trans Exclusionary Radical Feminist’s as the fourth pillar of hetero-patriarchy. Paul Twocock of Stonewall remarked on how important it is to recognise the diversity within the categories that are within ‘LGBT’ and how the movement to date has been void of many of the different voices and faces it claims to support and represent. He stressed the importance of working with LGBT people within their own communities, supporting them to achieve what they need on their own terms.re-radicalising 4 by Patrick Sue Sanders, another veteran LGBT activist and initiator of LGBT History Month spoke about how essential it is to acknowledge where we have come as a movement, and the impact that this work has had within the school system. Sue stressed how important it is to disrepute and disrupt the binaries which society forces on us and to embrace intersectionality. She entertained the audience with anecdotes and got great cheers when she suggested ‘being queer is being a bit naughty’. Finally, Bishop Alan Wilson asserted the need to tackle discrimination through the theology which supposedly props it up, reflecting on how much church and religious institutions have impacted on LGBT lives. Again highly entertaining, Bishop Alan proposed that if he was to take a ‘biblical view on sex and gender’ he would have a ‘mountain of foreskins’ in his back garden.

The audience were thoroughly engaged during the questions and answers session. Topics covered included the discrimination within the LGBT community itself, the importance and usefulness of categories and data collection, how language is important, which words should be celebrated and which ‘buried’, on how balance is struck between seemingly opposing agendas in faith and sexual freedom and how we ensure that the LGBT movement embraces non-white queers and tackles racism.

re-radicalising 7 by PatrickThe evening was closed by John Gilmore and Katja Hallenberg, the co-chairs of CCCq. John remarked: ‘Tonight is neither the beginning nor the end of this conversation, this event is about motivating, empowering and radicalising local activists to challenge the system we live in. We as a movement have never had our toe on the line, I suggest maybe towing the line away altogether.’ Katja added thanks to the various people within the university who worked behind the scenes in supporting the event, especially the Equality and Diversity Unit and the Vice-Chancellor’s office for their sponsorship. Special thanks were also given John who as the principle organiser ‘did the lion’s share of the work, from the initial idea, to sourcing amazing speakers and pulling everything together’.

The event achieved national media coverage due to NUS LGBT officer Fran Cowling refusing an invitation to speak unless Peter Tatchell pulled out. She stated that NUS membership would not permit her to share a platform with Tatchell because of accusations of racism and transphobia. John Gilmore noted that university were disappointed that NUS refused the invite, stating: ‘The student voice is of central importance to us and we really wanted to have NUS represented at the event. We understand that our community is diverse and that individuals will have divergent views, but think that we should bring these views together and debate them. This is what Re-Radicalising Queers was about. While we are disappointed that NUS felt that they could not attend, we are really delighted to have been able to work with our own LGBT+ student society and Students’ Union for this event and we are very lucky to have such eloquent and passionate representatives at CCCU, like Elzy who opened our event’.

Re-Radicalising Queers formed part of LGBT History Month events. For more information about the CCCq network and future events, follow the blog, our Twitter or email: cccq.equality@canterbury.ac.uk

***Photos courtesy of Patrick de Vries, full album can be found here.

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